What modality do you use to view the world around you?

Posts tagged “landfill

A “wasted” opportunity?

It’s that time of year when people are placing large unwanted household items (or ”waste”) out in front of their residences in preparation for the annual Brisbane City Council kerbside collection.

Indeed “one person’s waste” can be “another’s treasure” and quite often I spotted people placing a pre-loved set of golf clubs, children’s bike,  or old washing machine in their boot or on the back of a van. Curious as to what was appearing on the kerbs in my immediate neighbourhood, I  scouted around and documented what was being placed in front of people’s homes to see if there was a pattern of disposal occurring.

This is what I found:

KerbsideCollection Oct14-8423KerbsideCollection Oct14-8429 KerbsideCollection Oct14-8431 KerbsideCollection Oct14-8432 KerbsideCollection Oct14-8435KerbsideCollection Oct14-8437KerbsideCollection Oct14-8436 KerbsideCollection Oct14-8439 KerbsideCollection Oct14-8443 KerbsideCollection Oct14-8444 KerbsideCollection Oct14-8451KerbsideCollection Oct14-8450KerbsideCollection Oct14-8457 KerbsideCollection Oct14-8456KerbsideCollection Oct14-8461 KerbsideCollection Oct14-8422Random to organised placement of :

  • Furniture (desks, lounges, couches, indoor chairs garden patio chairs & tables, shelving, drawers, cabinets, TVs, bed mattresses, foam bedding, blankets, cupboards, cushions, light stands, kitchen benchtops, dressers)
  • Timber (structural house framing & weatherboards & VJ’s; toolboxes, doors, windows, glass panes, fence posts, fence palings, garden edging & retaining walls, pallets)
  • Garden equipment (hose reels, hoses, rakes, camping chairs, tarpaulins, gumboots)
  • Metal items (clothes racks, 44-gallon drums, iron trunk, Toolboxes, wire fencing, BBQs,  sheet metal, drain pipes, washing drying racks)
  • Cardboard box and styrofoam box packaging (from electrical goods like computers, stoves, fridges etc)
  • Kids toys (games, play yard equipment like swings basket ball rings and back boards, shell-shaped paddle pools/sandpits, radio controlled cars, table soccer, hula-hoops )
  • Electronic waste / e-waste (computer towers, monitors, & circuit boards, vacuum cleaners, Sound system speakers, oil heaters, faxes, printers, fridge)
  • Sport items (gym equipment, gold clubs & bags, bicycles, boogie board)
  • Plastic (waste and laundry baskets, milk crates, plastic pallets, storage boxes, buckets & pails)
  • Baby equipment ( prams, baby playpen, cot)
  • General household goods (mop, books, video cassettes, CDs, DVDs, photo albums, magazines, CD rack, photo frames, window blinds, suitcases)
  • and many more other items!

In general where items were broken, they could be repaired. Where they were worn, parts could be replaced. Where they were obsolete,thay could re-purposed. If used passed on or reused.

Our council website states what can and can not be placed out for kerbside collection and many of the above items do not comply. I made a telephone enquiry to the council officesto  learn that it that there are several contractors who participate in the kerbside collection who specialise in reclamation of metal waste, furniture, and  household goods (which are cleaned up and resold at Council “Tip Shops” which is heartening) and also white good items (e.g. fridges, washing machines).

However there is a lot of material that still ends up as landfill meaning on many cases that they become a lost resource. Considering that the council has a Towards Zero Waste strategy to reduce waste going to landfill using the waste reduction hierarchy of avoidance>reduce>reuse>recycle>disposal, it is surprising that there is no mention of upcycling, which is the process of converting old or discarded  materials or useless waste products into new materials or products that maintains or increases its value by being more useful, of  better quality, or having a different and more valuable purpose. This is not only an important waste reduction link, but also a critical finite resource consumption-reducing link that is a natural addition to recycling.  Through upcycling, new products are created from waste streams that have a higher value than if they were just disposed to landfill. For example, by reclaiming metals and constructing or refashioning something new from them, obviates the need of mining new metal from the earth thus reducing fuel/energy consumption and environmental impact. Tyres can be refashioned into water buckets, plant pots or sandals!  Creative reuse has become very popular amongst arts & crafts and homeware & gift suppliers. Others are taking this further by using upcycled products with a net-positive design approach.

In fact many of the items listed above would be seen as a resource boon to those living in developing countries where reclamation, re-use, jury-rigging and repurposing mwaste materials can be critical for providing shelter and housing, an income, or reducing urban pollution. For more info see Junkyard Planet and ideas/inspiration here.

So if you no longer have a use for something, don’t throw it, get it repaired, repurpose it, pass it on, recycle it, or upcycle it!

 

 Postscript 6th November 2014

It was disturbing to witness the council refuse truck arrive on the day of the kerbside collection in my street. During the short 30 minutes it took for them to “clean up” the street, I observed the council workers place the kerbside items into the compactor hopper of the garbage truck, hydraulically crush the items to fit into the truck, and then drive off (ultimately to the landfill site to dispose of their load of “rubbish”).

A wasted opportunity… !

Advertisements